A recent study looking for a link between antibiotics and cancer risk uncovers a complex relationship. The researchers conclude that there is an association between antibiotic use and an increase in colon cancer risk, but a decrease in rectal cancer risk. A new study finds an association between antibiotics and certain cancers. With the advent
0 Comments
A range of breathing treatments can help a person breathe more easily when they have a medical emergency, an infection, or a chronic health condition. Breathing treatments use medication to fight infections, remove mucus, dilate parts of the respiratory system, and improve breathing. Breathing disorders, such as asthma, affect at least 25 million people in
0 Comments
Researchers have attributed a substantial drop in human papillomavirus (HPV) infections to the HPV vaccine. Now, they are waiting to see if it will have the same impact on the rates of cervical cancer. Vaccines have slashed the number of HPV infections, new research suggests. Just over a decade ago, healthcare professionals introduced a new
0 Comments
Genetic research led by Queen Mary University of London could open the way to earlier identification of people at risk of heart failure and to the development of new treatments. The Queen Mary University of London team applied an artificial intelligence (AI) technique to analyse the heart MRI images of 17,000 healthy UK Biobank volunteers.
0 Comments
People often pass pebble poop in small, hard, separate lumps. However, the stool can also appear as a solid piece that looks as though it consists of pebbles. Both types are a sign of constipation. Constipation is a common problem that most people experience from time to time. Chronic constipation can be painful, and it
0 Comments
Investigators have now shown that only half of patients presenting with sinus, throat, or ear infections at different treatment centers received the recommended first-line antibiotics, well below the industry standard of 80 percent. The research is published this week in Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology. At traditional medical
0 Comments
New research examines the consumption of onion and garlic among women in Puerto Rico and suggests that the vegetables can significantly reduce the risk of breast cancer. Eating more onions and garlic could keep breast cancer at bay. Onions and garlic are part of the allium genus, along with leeks, chives, and hundreds of other
0 Comments
Prostate cancer is still very difficult to catch and treat early. Now, some researchers are looking for answers in the bacterial communities of prostate fluid. Could the microbiome offer a new way to approach prostate cancer? The microbiome is big news. Bacteria have taken center stage in the world of medical research. The microbiome is
0 Comments
Three new studies by scientists at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, in collaboration with researchers at the University of Cincinnati, highlight the relationship between air pollution and mental health in children. A study to be published Sept. 25 in Environmental Health Perspectives found that short-term exposure to ambient air pollution was associated with exacerbations of
0 Comments
Two teams at Harvard Medical School reported in separate papers in the May 21, 2015, issue of Cell that their labs have developed high-throughput techniques to quickly, easily and inexpensively give every cell in a sample a unique genetic barcode. This allows scientists to analyze complex tissues by genetically profiling hundreds of thousands of individual
0 Comments
With Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease, or GERD, acid splashes up into the esophagus repeatedly, which can damage the lining of the esophagus. In a process called metaplasia, damaged cells turn into a type of cell more like tissue found in the intestines. When this occurs in the esophagus, the condition is called Barretts esophagus. This video
0 Comments
New research has looked at human cancer cells implanted into mice, human tumor samples, and other assays in an attempt to better understand what drives the spread of certain aggressive cancers. A ‘chemical messenger’ could be helping aggressive cancers grow and spread. A team at Johns Hopkins Medicine in Baltimore, MD, has recently conducted a
0 Comments