Clinical Trials & Research

The out-of-pocket financial burden for insured working Americans is substantial and growing – especially when it comes to out-of-network, non-emergency hospital care, a new study has found. Researchers at The Ohio State University analyzed claims from more than 22 million enrollees in private insurance plans and found that out-of-pocket costs for non-emergency out-of-network hospital care
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The colour of our eyes or the straightness of our hair is linked to our DNA, but the development of Alzheimer’s disease isn’t exclusively linked to genetics, suggest recently published findings. In the first study published about Alzheimer’s disease among identical triplets, researchers found that despite sharing the same DNA, two of the triplets developed
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A training program that helps nursing homes offer advance care planning support to residents with Alzheimer’s disease and their family members is expanding to more than 170 nursing homes across the country. After a successful pilot led by Regenstrief Institute and Indiana University researchers, the National Institute on Aging announced an expected award of $3
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A new study by Yale Cancer Center (YCC) researchers shows understanding treatment patterns for patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is vital to develop strategies to improve outcomes. The findings were presented today at the 61st American Society of Hematology (ASH) meeting in Orlando, Florida. The annual conference is attended by an international audience of
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A computer betting game can help predict the likelihood that someone recovering from opioid addiction will reuse the pain-relieving drugs, a new study shows. The game, now being developed as an app, tests each patient’s comfort with risk-taking, producing mathematical scores called betas long used by economists to measure consumers’ willingness to try new products.
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Altruism and a lack of access and affordability are three reasons why people with chronic illnesses are turning to the “black market” for medicines and supplies, new research shows. Scientists at University of Utah Health and University of Colorado ran surveys to understand why individuals are looking beyond pharmacies and medical equipment companies to meet
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Amidst rising hopes for using CRISPR gene editing tools to repair deadly mutations linked to conditions like cystic fibrosis and sickle cell disease, a new study in the Nature journal Communications Biology describes a new innovation that could accelerate this work by rapidly revealing unintended and potentially harmful changes introduced by a gene editing process.
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Curing disease with neutrophils; this is the goal of the NeutroCure project. How will that work? “Neutrophils have a yin yang character,” explained Andrés Hidalgo, whose team at the Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares (CNIC) is one of six member groups participating in this project coordinated by Andriy Mokhir Friedrich from Alexander University, Germany. “Neutrophils
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A single infusion of ketamine, combined with outpatient behavioral therapy, helped alcohol-dependent individuals abstain from drinking for a few weeks after the treatment, researchers at Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons and New York State Psychiatric Institute have found. The findings could lead to a new approach to the treatment of alcohol use
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One of the most astounding discoveries of recent times is just how much influence gut bacteria have on our health and well-being. In addition to extracting nutrients from food, the collective activity of these tiny organisms protects us from infection and helps regulate our immune system. However, changes in the gut microbiota have been implicated
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UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers have developed a new automated method for testing hundreds of molecules at a time to find out which ones block cancer cells from consuming glucose – the sugars they need to spread and grow. Using robotics, the researchers tested 3,555 compounds on non-small-cell lung cancer cells. They identified 97
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Nov 29 2019 Postnova Analytics has posted a new on-demand webinar introducing how advanced analytical techniques are impacting the field of nanogeochemistry. The webinar discusses the advanced analytical approaches that are used to apply Asymmetric Flow Field-Flow Fractionation with online UV-Visible and ICP-MS detectors to nano-geochemical systems in the SWAMP (Soils, Water, Air, Manures, and
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Appropriately selected anticoagulation therapy can help to reduce the medical costs of patients suffering from atrial fibrillation. A new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows that direct oral anticoagulants can be a more cost-effective alternative than traditional warfarin therapy when the patient’s place of residence is taken into consideration. Published in Geospatial Health,
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Researchers from Queen Mary University of London and Zhengzhou University have developed a personalized vaccine system that could ultimately delay the onset of pancreatic cancer. The study provides strong proof-of-concept for the creation of a vaccine for cancer prevention in individuals at high risk of developing this disease and to slow down tumor growth in
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Scientists at the University of Toronto (U of T) and Arizona State University (ASU) have developed the first direct gene circuit to electrode interface by combining cell-free synthetic biology with state-of-the-art nanostructured electrodes. Study results were published today in Nature Chemistry. Long inspired by concepts from the field of electronics, with its circuits and logic
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Higher exposure to commonly used oral antibiotics is linked to an increased risk of Parkinson’s disease according to a recently published study by researchers form the Helsinki University Hospital, Finland. The strongest associations were found for broad spectrum antibiotics and those that act against anaerobic bacteria and fungi. The timing of antibiotic exposure also seemed
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ETH scientists have developed a special protective membrane made of cellulose that significantly reduces the build-up of fibrotic tissue around cardiac pacemaker implants, as reported in the current issue of the journal Biomaterials. Their development could greatly simplify surgical procedures for patients with cardiac pacemakers. “Every pacemaker has to be replaced at some point. When
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In 2018 the International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) and European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis (ESCEO) published the updated European guidance for the diagnosis and management of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. Now, the newly published position paper ‘Algorithm for the management of patients at low, high and very high risk of
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Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory scientists, with chemists and cancer biologists from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI), have developed a new therapy that extended the survival of mice with acute myeloid leukemia. The scientists are the first to demonstrate the anti-cancer effect of blocking the Salt-Inducible Kinase 3 (SIK3) pathway in leukemia using YKL-05-099, a drug developed
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Northwestern Medicine scientists have discovered a new phenomenon in the brain that could explain the development of early stages of neurodegeneration seen in diseases such as ALS, which affects voluntary muscle movement such as walking and talking. The discovery was so novel, the scientists needed to coin a new term to describe it: mitoautophagy, a
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A study by researchers at Yale has uncovered why belly fat surrounding organs increases as people age, a finding that could offer new treatment possibilities for improving metabolic health, thereby reducing the likelihood for diseases like diabetes and atherosclerosis that stem from inflammation. Led by Dr. Vishwa Deep Dixit, the Waldemar Von Zedtwitz Professor of
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A Yale-led collaborative study boosts scientific understanding of how the lung disease idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) progresses, providing a roadmap for researchers to discover new treatment targets for the disease. The study, led by Naftali Kaminski, M.D., the Boehringer-Ingelheim Endowed Professor of Internal Medicine and chief of the Section of Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Sleep
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