Children

In a new pre-clinical study published this week in the journal Leukemia, the research team of Children’s Hospital Los Angeles investigator Hisham Abdel-Azim, MD, MS, worked with colleagues to engineer T-cells to identify and target multiple sites on acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells instead of just one. The early collaboration points the way to future clinical
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As the world struggles with the coronavirus pandemic, more and more people are trying to protect themselves against the virus by all means possible. There are currently no vaccines against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), so boosting the immune system by way of diet, regular exercise, and sleep are sensible measures. It’s essential
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Mar 27 2020 Allison Jack, Assistant Professor, Psychology, is examining gene coexpression and brain connectivity in females with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). To do this, Jack is conducting a secondary analysis of de-identified data from a National Database for Autism Research collection called “Multimodal Developmental Neurogenetics of Females with Autism.” During
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Researchers from Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, China have looked at the outcomes of pregnant mothers with COVID-19 and their newborns. Their study titled, “Clinical features and obstetric and neonatal outcomes of pregnant patients with COVID-19 in Wuhan, China: a retrospective, single-center, descriptive study” was published in the latest
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Mar 23 2020 A multistate study of Medicaid enrollees led by researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center found that suicide risk was highest among youth with epilepsy, depression, schizophrenia, substance use and bipolar disorder. In addition, the odds of suicide decreased among those who had more mental health
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Poor diet is a significant contributor to chronic diseases, including cardiovascular disease, cancer, obesity, and diabetes accounting for early mortality. A new study published in the journal JAMA in March 2020 shows that dietary deficiency is both prevalent and pathogenic in today’s young America. Factors that affect diet quality include what children are fed when
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There were no hugs, handshakes or high-fives Tuesday morning at Juniper Elementary School, where the student drop-off line had transformed into a school lunch drive-thru. “Hi! How many?” asked school cafeteria manager Irene Huerta, 54, as she smiled and leaned toward an open car window. Then she handed over three hot, bagged lunches (taquitos and
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A new study from the MRC London Institute of Medical Sciences, in the UK, reports that while eating foods rich in sugar does not necessarily make you fat, they can make you very sick. They do this by increasing the level of a compound called uric acid in the blood. The study is published in
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Mar 19 2020 For decades, public health officials have directed the containment of emerging pandemics – perhaps most notably – the worldwide eradication of smallpox starting in the early to mid-1960s. Since then, surveillance systems have increased in number and sophistication with advances in data collection, analysis, and communication. From influenza
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Mar 16 2020 A component of breast milk may help protect premature babies from developing sepsis, a fast-moving, life-threatening condition triggered by infection. Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., have found — in newborn mice — that a molecule called epidermal
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Mar 12 2020 University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers have identified a new way that common Aspergillus molds can induce asthma, by first attacking the protective tissue barrier deep in the lungs. In both mice and humans, an especially strong response to this initial damage was associated with developing an overreaction to future
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Mar 12 2020 Parents researching childhood vaccinations online are likely to encounter significant levels of negative information, researchers at the University of Otago, Wellington, have found. Lead researcher Dr. Lucy Elkin says negative information about vaccines remains readily available on Google, Facebook and YouTube, despite attempts by the internet platforms to
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A new study published in the journal JAMA Pediatrics indicates that the optimal time of birth for twins is at 37 completed weeks of pregnancy. Twins are now being born more often because of an increase in the use of assisted reproductive techniques, in which almost a quarter result in twinning. Though only about 3%
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A molecular marker in saliva is associated with the emergence of childhood obesity in a group of preschool-aged Hispanic children. The intriguing discovery, reported in the journal BMC Medical Genetics, supports ongoing efforts to identify biomarkers associated with the emergence of childhood obesity before body mass index (BMI) is designated as obese, said Shari Barkin,
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Researchers with Nemours Children’s Health System utilized Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) to more precisely identify genomic characteristics of leukemias in children, the most common childhood cancer. The study, published today in BMC Medical Genomics, identified new genetic structural variants that could be used to assess the presence of minimal residual disease during the course of
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In the past, biologically-active peptides – small proteins like neurotoxins and hormones that act on cell receptors to alter physiology – were purified from native sources like venoms and then panels of variants were produced in bacteria, or synthesized, to study the structural basis for receptor interaction. A new technique called zombie scanning renders these
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Little data is available about the ability of antiviral drugs used to treat COVID-19, coronavirus, to enter breastmilk, let alone the potential adverse effects on breastfeeding infants. A new perspective article reviewing what is known about the most commonly used drugs to treat coronavirus and influenza is published in Breastfeeding Medicine, the official journal of
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