Month: June 2020

Jacy and Seth Boyack reopened their Arizona massage spa earlier this month from pandemic-driven closures. But they shut Citrus Massage back down after four days, citing safety concerns from the Covid-19 outbreak.  In an interview Monday on CNBC’s “The Exchange,” Jacy Boyack said that even working the front desk, she felt concerned.  “I’m not a massage
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Adenilson Souza Costa, 47 years, and his coworkers wearing protective gear carry a coffin at Vila Formosa Cemetery amidst the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic on May 18, 2020 in Sao Paulo, Brazil. Alexandre Schneider | Getty Images The coronavirus has now killed more than 500,000 people around the world as the number of confirmed infections exceeded
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Patients suffering from severe respiratory symptoms as a result of SARS-CoV-2 infection can rapidly generate virus-attacking T cells, and can increase this production over time, suggests a new study of T cells from 10 COVID-19 patients under intensive care treatment. In addition, 2 out of 10 healthy individuals without prior exposure to the virus harbored
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Jun 26 2020 Kindergartners in face masks. Closed playground structures. Random COVID-19 testing. They are among the long list of hypothetical scenarios for school in the pandemic era. And as lawmakers and educators reimagine the K-12 model for fall, a new survey assessed parents’ plans for in-person school and support for
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Student Loans are an unfortunate reality for most pre-med and medical students who are training to become future doctors. Let’s discuss the basics of student loans so you can graduate in the best financial position possible. πŸ’Œ Sign up for my weekly newsletter – https://medschoolinsiders.com/newsletter 🌍 Website & blog – https://medschoolinsiders.com πŸ“Έ Instagram – https://instagram.com/medschoolinsiders
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A new analysis of 16 years of publicly accessible health data on 68.5 million Medicare enrollees provides broad evidence that long-term exposure to fine particles in the air – even at levels below current EPA standards – leads to increased mortality rates among the elderly. Based on the results of five complementary statistical models, including
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Jun 26 2020 An innovative, interactive cloud-based data portal debuted this week that lets academic researchers mine the world’s largest and most comprehensive collection of scientific resources for studying pediatric solid tumors and their related biology. The Childhood Solid Tumor Network (CSTN) data portal on St. Jude Cloud was created to
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Delta Air Lines passenger planes are seen parked due to flight reductions made to slow the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19), at Birmingham-Shuttlesworth International Airport in Birmingham, Alabama, U.S. March 25, 2020. Elijah Nouvelage | Reuters Delta Air Lines is planning to send notices to warn more than 2,500 pilots next week about potential furloughs, according to
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Inhaled triple therapy with budesonide, glycopyrrolate, and formoterol showed a signal of reducing all-cause mortality in patients with moderate to severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) at higher (320 μg) budesonide doses in newly reported findings from the large, multicenter, 52-week ETHOS trial. Two doses of the glucocorticoid — 160 μg and 320 μg —
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Jun 26 2020 Researchers from the University of Tsukuba have identified a novel protein complex that regulates Aurora B localization to ensure that chromosomes are correctly separated during cell division It is no secret that DNA, in the form of chromosomes, is the building block of life. Incorrect distribution of chromosomes during cell division can
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Historically, half or more of people with type 1 diabetes develop kidney disease, which frequently progresses to kidney failure, requiring dialysis treatment or kidney transplantation for survival, according to a study in Diabetes Care. Development and progression of kidney disease in type 1 diabetes is associated with higher levels of a chemical in the blood
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A waiter wearing a protective face shield and mask serves customers at a Third Street Promenade restaurant on June 21, 2020 in Santa Monica, California. David Livingston | Getty Images The U.S. reported more than 34,400 coronavirus cases on Wednesday, according to a CNBC analysis of Johns Hopkins University data, after health officials in California,
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Jun 25 2020 The study shows that the involvement of certain genes that predispose to cancer also affects the immune system, which could facilitate tumor growth. In the specific case of breast cancer, the involvement of the SH2B3 gene, corresponding to a lymphocyte protein, increases the predisposition to develop cancer. The
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Jun 24 2020 In the future, taking your blood pressure medication could be as simple as eating a spoonful of rice. This “treatment” could also have fewer side effects than current blood pressure medicines. As a first step, researchers reporting in ACS’ Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry have made transgenic
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Connecticut Gov. Ned Lamont told CNBC on Tuesday that the leaders of Arizona and Texas, two states grappling with growing Covid-19 outbreaks, should reinstitute more aggressive containment strategies.  “I’d close down the bars,” Lamont, a Democrat, said on “Closing Bell.”  Both Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey and Texas Gov. Greg Abbott have said that a larger share of
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Jun 23 2020 The Parkinson’s Foundation today announced that it has awarded the third Parkinson’s Foundation Nurse Faculty Award to three nurses, totaling nearly $30,000. Each will receive nearly $10,000 in grant funding from the Foundation to launch individual projects to help make life better for people with Parkinson’s disease (PD)
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Mother’s chronic prenatal psychological distress and elevated hair cortisol concentrations are associated with gut microbiota composition of the infant, according to a new publication from the FinnBrain research project of the University of Turku, Finland. The results help to better understand how prenatal stress can be connected to infant growth and development. The study has
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