New research in mice finds that taking the antibiotic vancomycin before underoing radiation therapy alters gram-positive bacteria in the gut, thus boosting the immune system and enhancing the antitumor effect of the treatment. Share on PinterestA common antibiotic could make radiation therapy more effective. Globally, cancer continues to be the second leading cause of death,
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The out-of-pocket financial burden for insured working Americans is substantial and growing – especially when it comes to out-of-network, non-emergency hospital care, a new study has found. Researchers at The Ohio State University analyzed claims from more than 22 million enrollees in private insurance plans and found that out-of-pocket costs for non-emergency out-of-network hospital care
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Epilepsy is relatively common in children. Many children with epilepsy will outgrow the condition before their teens, and, if not, treatments usually ensure a full and healthy life. In this article, we look at the signs and symptoms of epilepsy in childhood, plus the different types of seizures and syndromes. We also discuss the treatment
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After studying the process in mice and flies, scientists suggest that failure to transport the molecular machines that break down proteins in cells could lie at the heart of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s. Share on PinterestFaulty transportation mechanisms within nerve cells may lead to neurodegeneration in Alzheimer’s or Parkinson’s disease. The ability
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Researchers using a new method of assessing risk factors for prostate cancer have found an intriguing link between a lack of physical activity and an increased risk of this condition. Share on PinterestNew evidence suggests that being physically active could help slash prostate cancer risk. Prostate cancer is the second most common type of cancer
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The colour of our eyes or the straightness of our hair is linked to our DNA, but the development of Alzheimer’s disease isn’t exclusively linked to genetics, suggest recently published findings. In the first study published about Alzheimer’s disease among identical triplets, researchers found that despite sharing the same DNA, two of the triplets developed
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It’s a gut-wrenching experience. While shopping or eating out, a nearby parent’s voice starts to raise, their patience exhausted with a child. Initial empathy turns to nervous monitoring as voices become harsh, language becomes threatening, arms are yanked and children swatted. As emotions, words and behaviors escalate, stakes feel high and people nearby may freeze
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Jacqueline Shreibati is moving to Google Health from AliveCor. screenshot, AliveCor Google is scooping up Dr. Jacqueline Shreibati, the chief medical officer for medical wearables start-up AliveCor. She will join the Google Health team, which is run by former health system executive Dr. David Feinberg and reporting to the chief health officer, Dr. Karen DeSalvo
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A training program that helps nursing homes offer advance care planning support to residents with Alzheimer’s disease and their family members is expanding to more than 170 nursing homes across the country. After a successful pilot led by Regenstrief Institute and Indiana University researchers, the National Institute on Aging announced an expected award of $3
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Seborrheic dermatitis is a skin condition that causes an itchy, flaky rash to develop on the scalp, face, or other parts of the body. Many people call it dandruff. Rarely, a person can experience temporary hair loss with seborrheic dermatitis. In this article, find out more about seborrheic dermatitis and how it may cause hair
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The gun violence seen in popular PG-13 movies aimed at children and teenagers has more than doubled since the rating was introduced in 1984. The increasing on-screen gun violence has raised concerns that it will encourage imitation, especially when it is portrayed as “justified.” What was not clear until now is whether justified and unjustified
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After marijuana and alcohol, prescription drugs are the most commonly misused substances by Americans age 14 and older. Education Images | UIG | Getty Images A Utah-based hospital chain pledged Wednesday to slash the number of opioid pills prescribed for patients with acute pain at its facilities by 40 percent by the end of 2018.
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Research by scientists at Harvard Medical School has found that nerves in the guts of mice do not merely sense the presence of Salmonella but actively protect against infection by deploying two lines of defense. More: https://hms.harvard.edu/news/more-watchdog
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A new study by Yale Cancer Center (YCC) researchers shows understanding treatment patterns for patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is vital to develop strategies to improve outcomes. The findings were presented today at the 61st American Society of Hematology (ASH) meeting in Orlando, Florida. The annual conference is attended by an international audience of
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The National Institute of Nursing Research, part of the National Institutes of Health, has awarded Wake Forest Baptist Health a five-year grant worth approximately $2.97 million to study the reasons for attrition in pediatric weight-management programs and develop better ways to predict and reduce dropout rates. Obesity is one of the foremost threats to the
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A recent study has investigated links between hair products and breast cancer. The findings have caused a stir, so in this article, we put the results into perspective. Share on PinterestA new study looks at hair dye and breast cancer risk. Overall, breast cancer affects around 1 in 8 women during their lifetime. Although breast
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Proteus Digital Health CEO Andrew Thompson Qin Chen | CNBC Proteus Digital Health has spent two decades trying to develop “smart pills” that can be used to tell a smartphone app whether patients have taken their medications. The technology was so promising that, three years ago, investors valued the company at $1.5 billion. But Proteus
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A computer betting game can help predict the likelihood that someone recovering from opioid addiction will reuse the pain-relieving drugs, a new study shows. The game, now being developed as an app, tests each patient’s comfort with risk-taking, producing mathematical scores called betas long used by economists to measure consumers’ willingness to try new products.
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If you buy something through a link on this page, we may earn a small commission. How this works. Braces are a type of orthodontic treatment that orthodontists use to help correct overcrowded or crooked teeth. Braces can also help correct an overbite. People who are getting braces soon or are considering them may wonder
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Colorado is taking a critical step to protect low-income women during their pregnancy through incentive-based smoking cessation interventions. A new study from the Colorado School of Public Health at the Anschutz Medical Campus shows a significant reduction in infant morbidity due to the program. The study, published in Public Health Nursing, examines the results of
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